Central Heating Poverty

When I was growing up in the UK, our house had no central heating.  It was rare. In cold weather, I had a hot water bottle in my bed to take the chill off. Other than that, there was no heating in the house overnight. When I was old enough, it was my job, first thing in the morning, to light the fireplace in the living room, which burned coke. The black stuff, not the white stuff. There was a gas poker that was used for a few minutes to light off the coke. Until age 11 I went to school in shorts year round, long trousers being the exclusive privilege of the upper forms.

We had a gas cooker and water heater, electric lights and refrigerator, plus a few small electric appliances such as a vacuum cleaner. The gas supply was not natural gas, it was made from coal and, unlike natural gas, was highly toxic. It was common that people, especially those living in flats (apartments), would have a coin-operated gas meter that needed to be fed to provide gas.

I couldn’t find data earlier than 1970, at which time adoption of central heating was at 30% of households and rising steeply. By 1990, it was 79% and by 2018, it was at 95%. (Statista). Almost all of that is based on natural gas. So now there is widespread panic about fuel poverty in the UK, as there is a shortage of natural gas. The government can print money, and even generate hot air in small quantities. But not natural gas. So, folks, you are going to have to turn down the central heat. Or off. But I can testify that you will survive.  Got eiderdown?

When I was 14, the family moved to Canada. Now, there, winter is a more serious matter.

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