Category Archives: Energy

Inflation

There is much noise that the Fed will raise interest rates to combat “inflation.”

Over the last year to the end of February, wages are up 2.8% (nominal). The price of oil, as a metric for energy prices, is up 32%.

Guess what is driving “inflation.”

The Saudis are still pumping as hard as they can, but justifying it on the grounds that they are storing the above-quota output, not selling it internationally. It seems to me that a tank in Saudi and a tank in Oklahoma are pretty much fungible, except that we at least think we know how much is in the Oklahoma tanks.

The bottom line is that global inventories of oil are continuing to expand to new records, more or less on a daily basis. The EIA is forecasting that US shale is set to expand production by 109k barrels from March to April, rising from 4.853mmbpd to 4.962mmbpd, and offsetting OPEC’s entire February production cut.

At some point we are going to see a reaction and that will be the end of “inflation.” For a while, anyway.

Crude Dreams

It seems like the price of crude oil is finally taking notice of the new records in inventories being set every week.

OPEC is ruminating about further cuts. The problem, for OPEC anyway, is that keeping the price high has fed a resurgence in US production as the rig count keeps driving higher and higher. A resurgence that will not easily be countered as the high prices have allowed producers to sell forward the oil that they have yet to produce either into the public futures market, or by private contract. Either way, they can drill with confidence in the pricing.

As a result, the global re-balancing of the oil markets that OPEC hoped to achieve remains a fantasy. GLWT.

As a side note, speculators’ most recently reported positions in WTI crude oil futures total about 525 million bbl., or nearly $27 billion at the current price of $51.

Pension Tsunami Sighted

NY Teamsters Pension Fund becomes first to run out of money.

Oh, and after the close the API announced that crude and product inventories continue to set new records. Not to worry, speculative buying continues. GLWT.

 

Socialism Is Good For You

If you need to lose weight, that is. Due to lack of food supply, Venezuelans have lost an average of 19lbs. over the last year. This despite having the largest proven oil reserves in the world.

Awash In Oil

Given the record level of oil inventories, it is amazing to me that the crude price is being sustained in the low $50s. This price is encouraging the shale producers to keep pumping, having sold forward their product into the futures market.

Now it seems that gasoline shipments are being diverted from New York as there is nowhere to put the stuff. Demand is down and everyone is carefully avoiding the obvious explanation – there is a recession underway.

Which rather surprises me – I would have thought that Trump’s Goldman advisers would want him to take the recession now, while there is still room to blame it (justly) on Obama, rather than further postpone and aggravate the inevitable outcome.

I don’t think the stock market will head lower until oil does. But it seems that Treasuries may be starting to reject the “Trumpflation” scenario.

Manipulation

Yesterday, the API reported a huge build in crude oil inventories. This morning, the EIA confirmed it. After a couple of minutes hesitation, the algos took over and marched crude up – and turned the Nasdaq and S&P green at the same time. As they have consistently as inventories have built.

MAnipulation has become completely obvious and shameless as the SEC’s so-called supervision turns a blind eye – could it be, perhaps? so that the SEC folks can discreetly become “compliance officers” with no work and large paychecks when they leave.

Inflation

The Fed sounded dovish on the inflation front today. As I have mentioned, there are only two prices worth worrying about. One is labor, up about 2.5% for 2016, and the other is energy. Oil is up from the $30s to the low $50s in the last year.

The real mystery is how oil prices are being kept up despite rapid growth in inventories of both crude oil and refined products, as well as domestic production. I have a sneaking suspicion that OPEC producers, at least, are selling product and partially offsetting their sales with purchases in the futures market, which is used to set contract prices, probably through proxies. We do know that speculative long positions in crude oil are at record levels (also in some other commodities, such as copper), and keep setting new records with each COT report. Someone has deep pockets.

Oil is the price to watch. As oil goes, so goes inflation – and the market, I suspect.

Going Out On A Limb

I think the end of this bubble is beginning, as yields spike and the dollar soars:

“Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp’d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.”

― William Shakespeare, The Tempest

The economy is not strong. There are 100+ million adults not working (“not in the labor force”) out of a total population of 325 million, to say nothing of the myriad of government employees who are employed, but not contributing any value to the economy.

Consumption is being sustained by debt, both private borrowing and government money-printing. By January 2009, the United States had accumulated $10.6 trillion in debt. The gross national debt – just federal government debt – stands at $19.7 trillion as of the end of FY2016. Spending is on a pace to add another $2.4 trillion this fiscal year (2017), surpassing $21 trillion by next September. Krugman applauds, and of course this is Obama, not Trump. Yet.

Debt-funded consumption in excess of income has crowded out savings and therefore investment. As investment has declined, so, logically enough, productivity growth has fallen (see previous post). Simultaneously, government has been growing, making a lethal cocktail for real household disposable incomes, which have been declining for years. Pensioners who think they are in good shape are not noticing that defined-benefit pension funds are already starting to cut benefits and many, especially state and local government funds, are woefully under-funded. Social Security is in negative cash flow, and drawing on the general tax revenue pot to make up the difference. The stock market is ludicrously over-valued and promises zero or negative returns to pension funds for years to come. As Margaret Thatcher notably said “Socialist governments traditionally do make a financial mess. They always run out of other people’s money. It’s quite a characteristic of them.”

Powerful deflationary forces are being unleashed. The world is awash in oil and efforts to keep the price up will eventually fail. OPEC in aggregate will not cut supply because its governments (as well as the non-OPEC ones) depend on the flow of oil money to stay in power. I expect oil to reach the lower $20s if not below. Most of the world is engaged in a race to the bottom, cutting interest rates to devalue their currencies and boost exports. They are therefore exporting deflation to the US. I expect to see CAD in the 0.60s and the EUR in the 0.80s. Consumer price inflation in the US appears comparatively strong due to the inclusion of OER¹ in the CPI, which is not done elsewhere, and due to the uncontrolled rise in healthcare and education prices, funded by government subsidies and debt. These prices end up being a form of taxation by the 0.01%, who are on the receiving end. The protest vote in the US election should be no surprise.

OER, a completely fictional number to start with, is high as a result of low interest rates financing housing bubbles. These will end as badly as the previous lot. I choose not to be a homeowner, largely because I don’t want to face a huge capital loss.

In short, the economy is a Potemkin village. Things are not as they are made out to be. Even a fractional increase in rates may trigger a deflationary crisis, especially considering the shortage of dollar liquidity outside the US.

¹ OER, Owner’s Equivalent Rent, is weighted about 25% of the CPI basket. It is estimated by a telephone survey of selected homeowners, asking them how much they think it would cost to rent their a property like theirs.It has nothing to do with what it actually costs them to own and live in their properties.  I am not kidding. Now do you think CPI means anything?

Ouch

Well the Trump bond slaughter has not been good to the portfolio. However, the strong dollar and the rapidly falling oil price are both powerful deflationary forces. Dr. Copper spiked, but was rapidly crushed today. Foreclosure filings increased 27% MoM in October, the largest increase since the run-up to the last property crisis. All of this bodes well that, once the powers that be feel that they have achieved their goal of getting the unwashed out of bonds and into equities in time for the real slaughter, happy days will be here again. In which light, it is amazing to see that the Russell 2000, an index with an undefined PE – due to aggregate lack of positive E – is the stellar performer. This smacks of a massive degree of (emotional?) retail participation in the Trump stock rally.

So I’m sitting tight.

BTW, my target for oil is $15-20, EUR is $0.80-0.85 and CAD $0.60-0.65.

Awash In Oil

Thanks to …zero hedge